Anatomy for Runners

timclarkLibrary

Anatomy for Runners Running has become more and more popular in recent years, with thousands of people entering marathons, buying new running shoes with the latest technology, and going for a daily jog, whether on the track or on a treadmill. Unfortunately, with running comes injuries, as a result of wrong information and improper training. Author Jay Dicharry was tired … Read More

The Science of Running

timclarkLibrary

The Science of Running by Steve Magness If you are looking for how to finish your first 5k, this book isn’t for you. The Science of Running is written for those of us looking to maximize our performance, get as close to our limits as possible, and more than anything find out how good we can be, or how good … Read More

Where Runners go Wrong

timclarkLibrary

Based on a 2012 Harvard study, this article looks at heel strikers (the most common type of runner) who have never been injured. Evaluating injury patterns and running styles, they looked into how impact load creates cumulative strain. Image Credit: Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

180 is Not a Magic Number

timclarkResearch

We’ve all heard that if you want to improve your running game, you should target a stride rate of 180 steps per minute. We’re not convinced. Our favorite example is our head of engineering. At 6’5” we’re pretty sure a 180 stride rate is a physical impossibility. We took a look at data we captured at the 2015 TCS NYC Marathon to look into … Read More

An Experiment with Stride Rate

timclarkTraining & Rehab, User Stories

When I joined RunScribe, I was more of a cyclist than a runner.  I’d been a runner in my younger years and was excited to get back to my running roots, but it took time for my body to acclimate to the strain. When I started to rack up more miles, I felt it in my legs — especially my … Read More

It Helps to Know How to Fly

timclarkAt the Races

Not a shocker but the more you fly, the faster you’ll finish a marathon.  Flight ratio is an indicator of efficiency, so we were particularly interested to look at our data from the 2015 NYC Marathon to analyze breakdown of flight ratio over finish times. We discovered flight ratio is much more strongly correlated to finish times than the infamous 180 … Read More